Peptides containing cysteine: the role of scavengers in cleavage cocktail

Since the development of Fmoc-based solid phase peptide synthesis, a wide variety of cleavage cocktails have emerged.  Each cleavage cocktail contains a unique combination of scavengers designed to prevent either side reactions mediated by the released protecting groups or the side chains themselves, or both during the peptide cleavage reaction.  As the number of scientists performing peptide synthesis grows, the question “which cleavage cocktail should I use?” comes up more often than not.

In today’s post, I’ll highlight the role of of scavengers for peptides containing cysteine residues.

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Optimizing the removal of an Acm protecting group

Disulfide rich peptides have gained significant attention recently due to their incredible biological stability and tolerance to epitope grafting.  This class of peptides is often folded in solution, assuming the desired disulfide bond pattern correlates with the most thermodynamically stable structure.  Sometimes though, especially for chemically synthesized cysteine rich peptides, this is not the case.  The result is a complex mixture of peptides with varying disulfide bonding patterns and identical mass.

Using pairs of cysteine residues with matched orthogonal side chain protecting groups during chemical synthesis allows for precise regioselective control of the disulfide bond pattern on-resin, simplifying final purification steps.  In today’s post, I’ll explore conditions for removing acetamidomethyl (Acm) protecting groups with simultaneous disulfide bond formation.

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